Tag Archives: USA

The Bay of Pigs: The Unsuccessful Invasion

The Bay of Pigs: The Unsuccessful Invasion


On the night of April 16th and 17th, 1961, 1,400 armed men on board a flotilla of small boats and landing-craft approached Bahía de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs) on the southern coast of Cuba. ‘Brigade 2506’ was mainly Cuban, with a handful of ‘North Americans’ (US citizens in Cuba-speak), refugees from the regime headed by Fidel Castro, which had overthrown the pro-US caudillo Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar 27 months earlier. The brigade’s goal was to oust Castro and the Fidelistas. Within three days, more than three quarters of them had been captured and more than 100 killed.

Theodore Roosevelt and his African safari

Theodore Roosevelt and his African safari

America’s 26th president Theodore Roosevelt, was a politician and stateman who seemed larger than life. His swashbuckingly style, his love of sport and outdoor activities, his earlier “Rough Rider” military exploits, and his capacity to grab the headlines made him immensely populat with the mass newspaper readership – especially within English-speaking world.

A Black worker in Soviet Union

A Black worker in Soviet Union

While much of the world faced depression, in the early 1930s the Soviet Union was booming. Stalin’s industrialisation programme was under way and to facilitate this, skilled foreign workers were brought into the country.  Among them was Robert Robinson (1907–1994) , a Jamaican-born Ford employee from Detroit. His experiences are detailed by Barbara Keys in “An African-American Worker in Stalin’s Soviet Union” (The Historian, vol71, no 1, Wiley-Blackwell).

The American War for Independence

The American War for Independence

Britain’s victory in the Seven Years’ War (1756 – 1763) seemed to confirm its position as the dominant imperial power. The Union Jack flew from Lake Superior to Calcutta, and English merchantmen and men-of-war ruled the waves. However, in just over a decade, the 13 American colonies were in revolt, and Britain fond itself confronting the rebels and a hostile Europe in the North Atlantic’s last great colonial war.

On this day: King Phillip’s War was ended

On this day: King Phillip’s War was ended

King Philip’s War of 1675-1676 was a predictable Indian rebellion against continuing Puritan incursions into Native American lands. Though Indian attacks were vicious, they were no more so than those the Puritans had waged with less provocation.

In May of 1637, several hundred recent Connecticut Valley settlers led by English Captain John Mason, formerly of Boston’s Dorchester settlement, surprised and torched a Pequot village while its warriors were absent. The Puritans surrounded the village and shot hundreds of women, old men and children attempting to escape the flames.