Tag Archives: Middle Ages

Leprosy in Middle Ages

Leprosy in Middle Ages


Leprosy, a debilitating and disfiguring affliction, has been feared and dreaded since biblical times. The bacterium that causes leprosy was discovered in the late 19th century; before than, particularly during medieval times, it was treated as a disease caused by moral uncleanliness.

Templars on trial

Templars on trial

The Order of the Temple was a religious-military institution founded by a group of warriors in Jerusalem in the decades following the First Crusade of 1097-99. The group first received royal and church approval in 1120, and papal authorisation in January 1129. They protected Christian pilgrims on the roads to the pilgrimage sites around Jerusalem and also helped to defend the territories that the First Crusade had conquered.

Love and life in the court of King James IV of Scotland

Love and life in the court of King James IV of Scotland

James IV‘s love life was no secret to his people. Marion Boyd had borne him a son in 1493. Margaret Drummond had been his mistress from 1496, but she died suddenly and rather suspiciously with her two sisters, after a breakfast in 1502, coveniently one year before the king was to celebtate his grand dynastic marriage to Margaret Tudor.

Serbian Nemanjic Dynasty

Serbian Nemanjic Dynasty

The Nemanjić (pronounced [nɛ̌maɲitɕ], Serbian: pl. Немањићи, Nemanjići) was the most important dynasty of Serbia in the Middle Ages, and one of the most important in Southeastern Europe. The royal house produced eleven Serbian monarchs between 1166 and 1371. It’s progenitor was Stephen Nemanja, who descended from a cadet line of the Vukanović dynasty (1101–1166).

A Legal Looting in Medieval England

A Legal Looting in Medieval England

In 1547, Thomas Michell murdered Eleanor and John Sydnam and then killed himself. Knowing Michell to be “a man of great possessions”, the local undersheriff, Nicholas Sarger, rushed to the murderer’s home to seize his belongings. When Sarger arrived, he found Michell’s neighbours already in the house, busily removing everything they could carry. And they weren’t the only ones taking an interest in the dead man’s effects for, soon after, Nicholas Heath, the king’s chief almoner, launched suits against Sarger and the others, claiming that the goods belonged to him.