Tag Archives: history

The last royal execution in Britain

The last royal execution in Britain


James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, the eldest of Charles II’s numerous illegitimate children, lived in Holland and in 1685 attempted to claim the English throne from his uncle James II. His rebellion, the last popular uprising in England, culminated in the last pitched battle on English soil, the Battle of Sedgemoor, on 6th July 1685.

Swearing, cursing and the English law

Swearing, cursing and the English law

Statutes passed between the reigns of  James I (1603 – 1625) and George III (1760 – 1820) criminalised swearing. These laws drew careful distinctions between swearing and cursing, imposed fines or the stock, and banded the penalties according to social rank.

Princess Elizabeth’s preparation to be the Queen

Princess Elizabeth’s preparation to be the Queen

On 10th December 1936, Princess Elizabeth of York was with her sister, Margaret, in their London home, 145 Piccadilly, when she became aware of people shouting for her father outside. Her father was away and her mother was ill in bed. Finally, she went to ask a footman the reason for the commotion. He replied that her beloved uncle, Edward VIII, had abdicated and her father was king.

Walter Ulbricht biography

Walter Ulbricht biography

It’s not insignificant that high school students in both parts of Germany know spot-on jokes about Walter Ulbricht: the now-deceased eighty-year-old left just as profound a mark on the political consciousness of Germans after the Second World War as Konrad Adenauer. And he was able to do this although even his most dispassionate critics ascribed to him all the qualities that normally stand in the way of political success: he was dry, boring, pale, not well connected, unimaginative, unattractive.

World War II: Aftermath Facts

World War II: Aftermath Facts

The cost of World War II is uncalculable in human or financial terms. estimates indicate that about 55 million people died in Europe during the World War II; of these, about 8 millions were German. Death was not for soldiers  – civilians died in their millions too, and came from many different  directions through these cruel years. In the opening stages of the war, as the German armies invaded Poland, Adolf Hitler wasted little time in organizing the killing of large numbers of non-combatants.