Tag Archives: Great Britain

The regalia of United Kingdom

The regalia of United Kingdom


The institution of an hereditary coronation regalia, serving as symbols of kingship, is attributed to the eleventh-century abbots of Westminster. Regarded as “monuments of superstition and idolatry” by the Commonwealth authorities, much of it was sold or melted down for coinage in 1649, so new regalia was required for the coronation of Charles II in 1661.

Princess Elizabeth’s preparation to be the Queen

Princess Elizabeth’s preparation to be the Queen

On 10th December 1936, Princess Elizabeth of York was with her sister, Margaret, in their London home, 145 Piccadilly, when she became aware of people shouting for her father outside. Her father was away and her mother was ill in bed. Finally, she went to ask a footman the reason for the commotion. He replied that her beloved uncle, Edward VIII, had abdicated and her father was king.

World War II: Aftermath Facts

World War II: Aftermath Facts

The cost of World War II is uncalculable in human or financial terms. estimates indicate that about 55 million people died in Europe during the World War II; of these, about 8 millions were German. Death was not for soldiers  Рcivilians died in their millions too, and came from many different  directions through these cruel years. In the opening stages of the war, as the German armies invaded Poland, Adolf Hitler wasted little time in organizing the killing of large numbers of non-combatants.

Prussia in 18th century

Prussia in 18th century

In the 18th century Prussia became a real military camp where everyone works for the army. The peasants were soldiers in the army and supported the army by their products, manufacturers provided the army with clothing and arms and nobles who were at Military Academy in Berlin led them as officers. The taxes for peasants and citizens were high, so army has constantly funded. Also, the peasants were forcibly recruited. They were not keen to left they fields and farms and go to the military campaigns.

First post-war Britain’s election in 1945: Attlee’s first acts

First post-war Britain’s election in 1945: Attlee’s first acts

The results of the election came as a surprise to almost everyone when they were announced on 26 July, including Clement Attlee (1883 – 1967): Labour had been swept to power on a landslide, winning just under 50% of the vote, to the Conservatives’ 36%. Labour won 393 seats, giving them a majority of 146 seats.The new government had an unusually clear idea of what it wanted to achieve, and backbenchers were instructed to avoid private members’ bills and concentrate on voting the government’s legislation through.