Tag Archives: Great Britain

Spencer Perceval’s assassination

Spencer Perceval’s assassination

All that is generally remembered about Spencer Perceval is that he was the only British prime minister ever to be assassinated. By all accounts he was a thoroughly decent, honourable and competent man, but he was cut off in his prime and failed to make any lasting mark. A lawyer, born in London, the younger son of an aristocratic family and educated at Harrow and Cambridge, he became an MP in his thirties in 1796.

The battle of Gallipoli: Australian and New Zealand soldiers

The battle of Gallipoli: Australian and New Zealand soldiers

It was a still night with a sea-mist. As the men clambered over the side of the ship into the small boats below, their officers were terrified that the sound of muttered curses and boots scraping on steel decks would reach the Turkish lines a few miles across the water. At last the boats were full, crammed with men, ammunition and rations for three days.

What is the nature of Margaret Thatcher’s legacy?

What is the nature of Margaret Thatcher’s legacy?

The Iron Lady is as polarising in death as she was in life. While some mourn her passing and hail the late Baroness as a pioneer, others have been holding street parties in celebration of her demise. But, other issues aside, what did Thatcher do for female empowerment? Former Conservative prime minister Margaret Thatcher died earlier this week at the age of 87. Here, leading historians discuss her impact on British politics ‑ and the nature of her legacy, and BBC History Magazine brings it to the readers.

Tasmania, 1803 – 1836

Tasmania, 1803 – 1836

After the departure of Baudin from Sydney it was discovered that there was an inclination on the part of the French to settle in some part of Australia. It was known that the inlet called Storm Bay, in the island then known as Van Diemen’s Land, had especially attracted their notice, its shores having been so green and leafy.

King George III’s illness

King George III’s illness

Recent research has thrown considerable doubt on the claim that King George III suffered from variegate porphyria, but indicates that he suffered recurrent attacks of mania as part of his bipolar disorder. George III’s last episode of ill health occurred during the final decade of his life (1810–20). This has been diagnosed as chronic mania with an element of dementia. During this period the king was blind and possibly deaf, which may have contributed to his psychiatric condition.