Tag Archives: Germany

Walter Ulbricht biography

Walter Ulbricht biography


It’s not insignificant that high school students in both parts of Germany know spot-on jokes about Walter Ulbricht: the now-deceased eighty-year-old left just as profound a mark on the political consciousness of Germans after the Second World War as Konrad Adenauer. And he was able to do this although even his most dispassionate critics ascribed to him all the qualities that normally stand in the way of political success: he was dry, boring, pale, not well connected, unimaginative, unattractive.

Friedrich Engels, The Father of Socialism

Friedrich Engels, The Father of Socialism

For much of the 20th century, the image and ideas of Friedrich Engels were eerily familiar as he stood alongside Marx, Lenin and Stalin (or Mao) in the official communist pantheon. Yet today even Marx impersonators have forgotten his name. You can still visit city of Engels in Russia, there are still statues of Engels in Moscow and Berlin, but his intellectual and political legacy has all but been extinguished.

Dietrick of Bern

Dietrick of Bern

Dietrick of Bern was a heroic but contradictory fictional figure in medieval south Germanic poetry. A 13th century Icelandic author collected the stories into a coherent sequence and incorporated other heroic legends. Medieval chroniclers held that Dietrick was a poetic representation of Theodoric the Great, the 5th century Ostrogothic ruler of Italy.

Thomas Müntzer and Peasants’ War

Thomas Müntzer and Peasants’ War
Peasant-plebeian movement in Reformation strongest was expressed in the Anabaptist movement and the Peasants’ War in Germany 1524-1525. Peasants and urban population (plebs) could not accept Lutheranism and princely Reformation. There were a new sects in the Reformation movement. Anabaptists (re-baptized because they required re-baptism in the mature years of life) were particularly disseminated in the plebeian classes. Some revolutionary Anabaptists preached the abolition of private property and common property.

German New Guinea – How Germany lost its territory in Pacific

German New Guinea – How Germany lost its territory in Pacific

In August 1914 the British called on the Australian and New Zealand governments to capture Germany’s colonial possessions in the Pacific. Among the most important was German New Guinea, annexed in 1884. Comprising the north-east of the island (Kaiser-Wilhelmsland) and several nearby islands (the Bismarck Archipelago), German New Guinea boasted Germany’s largest force in the Pacific, with more than 600 natives led by German officers and reservists.