Tag Archives: England

Anne Boleyn’s marriage preparation

Anne Boleyn’s marriage preparation


There had been persistent rumours throughout the summer of 1532 that Anne and Henry would marry during the interview at Calais. At first, Anne had gone out of her way to encourage the gossip. ‘Not later than a week ago’, Chapuys reported in late August, ‘she wrote a letter to her principal friend and favourite here, whom she holds as sister and companion, bidding her to get ready against this journey and interview, where, she says, that which she has been so long wishing for will be accomplished’.

The Parliament of England

The Parliament of England

The term ‘parliament’ came into use in the early 13th century to describe a national forum for discussion, and the institution’s origins lay in the consultative Great Council, consisting of the nobility and senior clergy, which had been regularly summoned by English monarchs since the Norman Conquest.

The Gunpowder Plot

The Gunpowder Plot

Lord Monteagle received a startling letter on the evening of 26 October 1605. An anonymous correspondent advised the English nobleman against attending the upcoming session of parliament, due to begin a few days later. The letter warned: “They shall receive a terrible blow this parliament and yet they shall not see who hurts them”. It was a chilling message.

The peasant who became Edward III’s mistress

The peasant who became Edward III’s mistress

Research is shedding new light on one  of medieval England’s most notorious women. An investigation by University of York historian Mark Ormrod has revealed that Alice Perrers, Edward III’s mistress, was almost certainly from the peasant background.

The slang in Elizabethan London

The slang in Elizabethan London

Pronunciation of words in Elizabethan English is a complicated matter, since linguistically it rests between the “say what you see” rules of Middle English and the more esoteric pronunciations of Modern English.  It is unreasonable to have the term ‘cider’ pronounced ‘zoiderr’, ‘farmer’ as ‘varmerr’; ‘house’ as ‘hoos’; ‘tea’ as ‘tay’; ‘grass’ as ‘grace’ or ‘graz’; ‘creek’ as ‘crik’.  Also there are regional things to keep in mind, for instance in the East and North counties.