Tag Archives: book reviews

Book review: The First Crusade: The Call from the East by Peter Frankopan

Book review: The First Crusade: The Call from the East by Peter Frankopan


Author: Peter Frankopan
Publisher: Bodley Head
Reviewed by: Norman Housley
Price (RRP): £20

Norman Housley has mixed feelings about the latest attempt to write a narrative of the First Crusade

Book review: Moll: The Life and Times of Moll Flanders by Sian Rees

Book review: Moll: The Life and Times of Moll Flanders by Sian Rees
Author: Sian Rees
Publisher: Chatto & Windus
Reviewed by: Hallie Rubenhold
Price (RRP): £18.99

Hallie Rubenhold applauds an ambitious depiction of the historical backdrop to Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders

It goes without saying that writing ‘a life and times’ of a personality who never actually lived is going to present a few difficulties for a historian.

Book review: Secret Days by Asa Briggs

Book review: Secret Days by Asa Briggs
Author: Asa Briggs
Publisher: Frontline Books
Reviewed by: Roger Moorhouse
Price (RRP): £19.99

From being Britain’s best kept wartime secret barely a generation ago, the story of the code-breakers of Bletchley Park is now a well-established part of our national narrative of the Second World War.

Book review: The Pleasures of the Imagination by John Brewer

Book review: The Pleasures of the Imagination by John Brewer

John Brewer’s The Pleasures of the Imagination: English Culture in the Eighteenth Century documents the 18th century creating of “high culture”.  However, this creation is not reported as a formal aesthetic decision, supervised by an aloof elite of aristocrats and dilettantes.

Book review: Poxed and Scurvied by Kevin Brown

Book review: Poxed and Scurvied by Kevin Brown
Author: Kevin Brown
Publisher: Seaforth Publishing
Reviewed by: Glyn Williams
Price (RRP): £25

Despite its gimcrack title this is a serious work by an author well qualified in medical matters.
The first half describes health problems in the Royal Navy during the sailing ship era; there is little on the mercantile marine or on foreign seafarers. It is a story of gradual improvement, but from a low base.