Tag Archives: archeology

The Puzzle of Proto-Elamite

The Puzzle of Proto-Elamite

In a room at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, high above the fragments of early civilisations that are housed there, a camera dome flashes out light, yielding detailed, high-quality images of ancient written tablets. Thanks to this process of Reflectance Imaging Technology (RTI) our knowledge of the world’s oldest undeciphered writing, known as proto-Elamite and dating to before 3000 BC, is undergoing a transformation.

Olmecs: Early civilisations in Central America

Olmecs: Early civilisations in Central America

Fundamental features of Central American civilisation first appeared between 1200 and 150 BC: stelae and monuments commemorating rulers and their reighn, the hieroglyphic writing system, a complex notation of calendrical calculations, and the ritual ball game, were all established.

Viminacium – Roman town and military camp

Viminacium – Roman town and military camp

Viminacium, Roman archeological site in Serbia, has been the object of interest of various explorers for centuries. At the end of the 17th century it was visited by Count Marsigli, who published his observations in his work Danubius Pannonicomysicus in 1726. In the 19th century Felix Kanitz visited Viminacium on several occasions and left record of what he saw in several of his books. Several other foreign and Serbian authors also wrote about Viminacium (Ladek, Premerstein, Momsen, Brunschmidt, Vulić and others).

Pompeii and Herculaneum: The cities from the past

Pompeii and Herculaneum: The cities from the past

Pompeii is one of the largest tourist draws in Italy. The town presents visitors with an overwhelming array of archeological evidence, with much more preserved in museum storerooms. When the eruption of Vesuvius started on the morning of 24 August, AD 79, it caught the local population utterly unprepared. Although at the same time, as we now know in retrospect, all the tell-tale signs were there to warn them.

Anglo-Saxon Gold Rewrites History

Anglo-Saxon Gold Rewrites History

An enormous hoard of gold, unearthed in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, UK, on 5th July 2009, is proving to be one of the most astonishing European archeological discoveries for decades.The find, discovered by an amateur metal-detecting enthusiast Terry Herbert – comprises more than 1,500 items, amounting to more than five kilogrammes of gold and including remains of 84 sword pommels, three crosses and several helmets. This compares with the 1.5 kilogrammes of gold in Sutton Hoo in Suffolk – previously the largest Anglo-Saxon treasure trove ever discovered.