The Obelisks of Ancient Egypt

One of the oldest and most iconic structures of ancient Egypt is the obelisk. A rising tower of stone, it was designed to astound mortals with its height and impress the immortals More »

The baby who provoked a revolution

The birth of a male heir to James II of England made possible a permanent Catholic dynasty. Several Protestants echoed Mary and Anne’s doubts that the baby had been smuggled into the More »

Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

 

On this day – 22nd May

On this day – 22nd May

1570  Abraham Ortelius published the first modern atlas in Belgium

1819  The steamship Savannah became the first to cross the Atlantic Ocean
1892  Dr. Sheffield, a British dentist, invented the toothpaste tube
1908  The Wright brothers registered their flying machine for a U.S. patent

Tracing England’s First Castle

Tracing England’s First Castle

A British amateur historian has found what he believes to be England’s oldest castle – built by Norman adventurer 15 years before the battle of Hastings. Ground-breaking research by an expert on Herefordshire castles, Terry Wardle, strongly suggest that a mystery Norman castle mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the year 1051 was built in Herefordshire at a place now known as Burghill.

The Reluctant Bathing

The Reluctant Bathing

French king Henri IV sent an emissary to the Paris home of his superintendent of finances, the Duc de Sully, in 1610 to request his presence at a meeting. On the arrival the messenger was shocked to find Sully taking a bath. The Duc prepared to leave his bath and attend the king but the messenger stalled him, alarmed.

On this day – 21st May

On this day – 21st May

1790  Paris was divided into 48 zones

1840  New Zealand was declared a British colony
1934  Oskaloosa, IA, became the first city in the U.S. to fingerprint all of its citizens
1982  The British landed in the Falkland Islands and fighting began

The Bogomils

The Bogomils

The Bogomils were members of a religious sect that at its peak held enormous influence over the Balkan countries between the 10th and 15th centuries. Founded in Bulgaria in the mid-tenth century by a priest named Bogomil, the sect relied heavily on the belief in dualism – that the universe was ruled jointly by the forces of good and evil.