The Obelisks of Ancient Egypt

One of the oldest and most iconic structures of ancient Egypt is the obelisk. A rising tower of stone, it was designed to astound mortals with its height and impress the immortals More »

The baby who provoked a revolution

The birth of a male heir to James II of England made possible a permanent Catholic dynasty. Several Protestants echoed Mary and Anne’s doubts that the baby had been smuggled into the More »

Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

 

The importance of the battle of Marathon

The importance of the battle of Marathon

“For if you agree with me that we should fight, you make your country free and your city the best in all of Greece. But if you choose not to fight, we will lose it all” (Herodotus 6.109)

So spoke the Athenian general Miltiades to his fellow general Callimachus, setting in motion one of the greatest military gambles in history. The date was 490 BC. The place was Marathon. The mission: to resist the invasion of the Persian army, the largest fighting force ancient Greece had ever seen.

Book review: Moll: The Life and Times of Moll Flanders by Sian Rees

Book review: Moll: The Life and Times of Moll Flanders by Sian Rees
Author: Sian Rees
Publisher: Chatto & Windus
Reviewed by: Hallie Rubenhold
Price (RRP): £18.99

Hallie Rubenhold applauds an ambitious depiction of the historical backdrop to Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders

It goes without saying that writing ‘a life and times’ of a personality who never actually lived is going to present a few difficulties for a historian.

Hitler’s bloody swastika

Hitler’s bloody swastika

The Blutfahne or Blood Flag was one of the most sacred relics of nazi Germany. Originally the banner of the fifth Sturm of the Munich SA, it was soaked with the blood of the fallen when the Munich Putsch (“Beer Hall Putsch”) was crushed in November 1923. The blood was primarily from party member Andreas Bauriedl who was shot by Munich police and then fall on top of the flag.

Carolingian House of the Kingdom of France

Carolingian House of the Kingdom of France

The Carolingian dynasty (known variously as the Carlovingians, Carolings, or Karlings) was a Frankish noble family with origins in the Arnulfing and Pippinid clans of the 7th century AD. The family consolidated its power in the late 7th century, eventually making the offices of mayor of the palace and dux et princeps Francorum hereditary and becoming the de facto rulers of the Franks as the real powers behind the throne.

Theodore Roosevelt and his African safari

Theodore Roosevelt and his African safari

America’s 26th president Theodore Roosevelt, was a politician and stateman who seemed larger than life. His swashbuckingly style, his love of sport and outdoor activities, his earlier “Rough Rider” military exploits, and his capacity to grab the headlines made him immensely populat with the mass newspaper readership – especially within English-speaking world.