The Obelisks of Ancient Egypt

One of the oldest and most iconic structures of ancient Egypt is the obelisk. A rising tower of stone, it was designed to astound mortals with its height and impress the immortals More »

The baby who provoked a revolution

The birth of a male heir to James II of England made possible a permanent Catholic dynasty. Several Protestants echoed Mary and Anne’s doubts that the baby had been smuggled into the More »

Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

 

How child labour changed the world

How child labour changed the world

Britain’s industrial revolution – the first in the world – would never had happened without child labour. That’s the startling conclusion drawn by a leading economic historian following the most detailed analysis of relevant contemporary sources ever carried out.

Book review: A Visitor’s Guide to the Ancient Olympics by Neil Faulkner

Book review: A Visitor’s Guide to the Ancient Olympics by Neil Faulkner
Author: Neil Faulkner
Publisher: Yale University Press
Reviewed by: Paul Cartledge
Price (RRP): £14.99

Paul Cartledge savours a breezy history of the ancient Greek Olympics, presented in travel-guide style

Hohenzollern Dynasty

Hohenzollern Dynasty

The Hohenzollerns were German dynasty and princely family who rose to power in the late Middle Ages, becoming electors of Brandenburg in 1415; in the late nineteenth century, they would become the ruling house of Prussia and of imperial Germany.

Leprosy in Middle Ages

Leprosy in Middle Ages

Leprosy, a debilitating and disfiguring affliction, has been feared and dreaded since biblical times. The bacterium that causes leprosy was discovered in the late 19th century; before than, particularly during medieval times, it was treated as a disease caused by moral uncleanliness.

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandals was a name of a group of two tribes, the Silingians and the Hasdingians, that lived in the area between the rivers Oder and Vistula before they migrated to the Danube region during the second century AD. A memory of their time in northern Europe is the region of Silesia, which is named after the Silingians. At the beginning of the fifth century were the Vandals forced to migrate to the west because of pressure from the Huns.