Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

Napoleon Bonaparte’s relatives after he lost power in France

What happened to Napoleon Bonaparte‘s relatives after he lost power in France? They could not stay in France but, perhaps surprisingly, they came to little harm – with the exception of Napoleon’s More »

When and where was the trebuchet invented?

Like many premodern technologies, it is not known when or where the first trebuchet appeared. Unlike ancient artillery, which relied on torsion (twisting) to supply ballistic force, medieval trebuchets utilised a simpler More »

 

Hohenzollern Dynasty

Hohenzollern Dynasty

The Hohenzollerns were German dynasty and princely family who rose to power in the late Middle Ages, becoming electors of Brandenburg in 1415; in the late nineteenth century, they would become the ruling house of Prussia and of imperial Germany.

Leprosy in Middle Ages

Leprosy in Middle Ages

Leprosy, a debilitating and disfiguring affliction, has been feared and dreaded since biblical times. The bacterium that causes leprosy was discovered in the late 19th century; before than, particularly during medieval times, it was treated as a disease caused by moral uncleanliness.

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandals was a name of a group of two tribes, the Silingians and the Hasdingians, that lived in the area between the rivers Oder and Vistula before they migrated to the Danube region during the second century AD. A memory of their time in northern Europe is the region of Silesia, which is named after the Silingians. At the beginning of the fifth century were the Vandals forced to migrate to the west because of pressure from the Huns.

How many prisoners were freed by the storming of the Bastille?

How many prisoners were freed by the storming of the Bastille?

Actually, only seven. In France, 14th July, Bastille Day, is a national holiday and a glorious national symbol, equivalent to 4th July in the United States of America. From the rousing paintings of the scene, you might think hundreds of proud revolutionaries flooded into streets waving tricolours. In fact, only just over half a dozen people were being held at the time of the siege.

Viminacium – Roman town and military camp

Viminacium – Roman town and military camp

Viminacium, Roman archeological site in Serbia, has been the object of interest of various explorers for centuries. At the end of the 17th century it was visited by Count Marsigli, who published his observations in his work Danubius Pannonicomysicus in 1726. In the 19th century Felix Kanitz visited Viminacium on several occasions and left record of what he saw in several of his books. Several other foreign and Serbian authors also wrote about Viminacium (Ladek, Premerstein, Momsen, Brunschmidt, Vulić and others).