The baby who provoked a revolution

The birth of a male heir to James II of England made possible a permanent Catholic dynasty. Several Protestants echoed Mary and Anne’s doubts that the baby had been smuggled into the More »

Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

Napoleon Bonaparte’s relatives after he lost power in France

What happened to Napoleon Bonaparte‘s relatives after he lost power in France? They could not stay in France but, perhaps surprisingly, they came to little harm – with the exception of Napoleon’s More »

 

Book Review: Guernsey Evacuees: The Forgotten Evacuees of the Second World War by Gillian Mawson

Book Review: Guernsey Evacuees: The Forgotten Evacuees of the Second World War by Gillian Mawson

Author: Gillian Mawson
Publisher: The History Press Ltd
Reviewed by: the author
Price (RRP): £14.99

Publication Date: 1 Nov 2012

Since 2008, Gillian Mawson, writer and historian, has been interviewing those evacuees who fled the Channel Islands to mainland Britain in June 1940, just a few days prior to the German Occupation of the Channel Islands.

The slang in Elizabethan London

The slang in Elizabethan London

Pronunciation of words in Elizabethan English is a complicated matter, since linguistically it rests between the “say what you see” rules of Middle English and the more esoteric pronunciations of Modern English.  It is unreasonable to have the term ‘cider’ pronounced ‘zoiderr’, ‘farmer’ as ‘varmerr’; ‘house’ as ‘hoos’; ‘tea’ as ‘tay’; ‘grass’ as ‘grace’ or ‘graz’; ‘creek’ as ‘crik’.  Also there are regional things to keep in mind, for instance in the East and North counties.

On this day: The Battle of Hastings 1066

On this day: The Battle of Hastings 1066

Harold II was king for less than a year, yet his rule was among the most dramatic and fateful of any ruler of England. It was dominated by his disputed succession. Harold Hardrada in Norway, and William, Duke of Normandy, both believed their claims were superior and both mounted invasion to support them.

The recruitment in English Civil War

The recruitment in English Civil War

In the middle of the 17th century England experienced a great convulsion of political and military violence, which quickly spread to engulf Scotland, Ireland and Wales. This was a true civil war, in which men and women at all levels of society, sometimes even within the same family, took different sides on issues of principle, and fought for them to the death.

Abraham Lincoln: United States at the crossroads

Abraham Lincoln: United States at the crossroads

Abraham Lincoln’s victory in the presidential election in November 1860 set the United States on the path to bloody civil war. Ever since the drafting of America’s federal constitution in 1787, the question of slavery had given rise to political contention and compromise. In the early years of the new American nation, several northern states adopted statutes of emancipation, while new technology and the international demand for cotton gave slave labour deep roots in the south.