Red Indians and how to tame them

The Elizabethans’ colonial voyages brought them into contact with a people very different level of civilisation from their own—the ‘Indians’ of the New World, as is illustrated by the account written in More »

Mormons in search of Promised Land, 1846-69

The Mormons have been described as the most systematic, organised, disciplined and successful pioneers in American history. For over 20 years they were one of the main forces driving the settlement of More »

‘Alien’ citizens in the Medieval England

Thousands of foreigners poured into England in the Middle Ages. Similar like today, they have been attracted to England by job opportunities or possibility to study. Finding these everyday immigrants is no easy task. More »

Napoleon Bonaparte’s relatives after he lost power in France

What happened to Napoleon Bonaparte‘s relatives after he lost power in France? They could not stay in France but, perhaps surprisingly, they came to little harm – with the exception of Napoleon’s More »

When and where was the trebuchet invented?

Like many premodern technologies, it is not known when or where the first trebuchet appeared. Unlike ancient artillery, which relied on torsion (twisting) to supply ballistic force, medieval trebuchets utilised a simpler More »

 

The Puzzle of Proto-Elamite

The Puzzle of Proto-Elamite

In a room at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, high above the fragments of early civilisations that are housed there, a camera dome flashes out light, yielding detailed, high-quality images of ancient written tablets. Thanks to this process of Reflectance Imaging Technology (RTI) our knowledge of the world’s oldest undeciphered writing, known as proto-Elamite and dating to before 3000 BC, is undergoing a transformation.

What is the nature of Margaret Thatcher’s legacy?

What is the nature of Margaret Thatcher’s legacy?

The Iron Lady is as polarising in death as she was in life. While some mourn her passing and hail the late Baroness as a pioneer, others have been holding street parties in celebration of her demise. But, other issues aside, what did Thatcher do for female empowerment? Former Conservative prime minister Margaret Thatcher died earlier this week at the age of 87. Here, leading historians discuss her impact on British politics ‑ and the nature of her legacy, and BBC History Magazine brings it to the readers.

Jacob Tonson and the Kit-Cat Club

Jacob Tonson and the Kit-Cat Club

In the snowy spring of 1733, Samuel Croxall, a classical translator, travelled to Herefordshire to visit his retired publisher, Jacob Tonson. Tonson was now an emaciated, deaf old man, who spent his days drinking sack and reading by the fireside. According to Alexander Pope, however, Tonson’s mind remained “full of matter, secret history, and wit and spirit“. Croxall was hoping to extract some of this „secret history“ – an account of the most important London gentlemen’s club of the early 1700s, founded by Tonson: the Kit-Cat Club.

The First Crusade: The shock of the new?

The First Crusade: The shock of the new?

When in March of 1095 Pope Urban II made a speech to an assembly of French nobility and clergy at Clermont, in which he explained that the Christians in the east, both Catholic and Orthodox, were facing daily attacks and depredations from the Muslim population and lords, and offered those who would unite against this common foe remission of their sins, few could have expected the huge impact that his words would have on both East and West.

Karadjordjevic royal family

Karadjordjevic royal family

The Karadjordjevic dynasty is over two centuries old. In 1804, a wealthy Serbian clan chief and leader George (Djordje) Petrovic – known to his followers as “Karadjordje” or “Black George”, after his dark looks – led the Serbs in an uprising against the Ottoman Empire which controlled the Balkans at that time. This first revolt against the Ottoman occupation in the Balkans is known in Serbian history as “The First Serbian Uprising” (Prvi Srpski Ustanak).