Category Archives: MODERN HISTORY

What was the punishment of “burnt in the hand”?

What was the punishment of  “burnt in the hand”?


This punishment was laid down in Tudor times for those who successfully pleaded Benefit of Clergy, whereby members of the church found guilty of various felonies were spared the death sentence. in court, anyone could claim to be a member of the clergy; the test was reading out the passage from the Bible.

Holland’s Golden Age

Holland’s Golden Age

The expansion of trade and the importance of commerce in 17th century Europe is best reflected in the wealth and power of the United Netherlands. The Dutch people, numbering barely 1.5 million, thrived behind the earthen walls that protected their small country from the North sea. The Netherlands had been a manufacturing center since the Middle Ages, and in the middle of the 16th century, Antwerp served as the commercial hub of northern Europe.

Manchester Martyrs

Manchester Martyrs

In September 1867, Colonel Thomas Kelly and Captain Timothy Deasy were arrested in the centre of Manchester on suspicion of terrorism. News of their arrest was immediately sent to Mr. Disraeli, the Prime Minister, as Colonel Kelly was the most prominent Fenian of them all, having only recently been confirmed as Chief Executive of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and as such was considered quite a capture.

King Charles’ II Flight after the Battle of Worcester

King Charles’ II Flight after the Battle of Worcester

On Friday 5th of September 1651 the future king Charles II hid in a Shropshire barn. It was Francis Wolfe of madley who provided this shelter from imprisonment and death, as Charles fled from defeat at the Battle of Worcester. Years later, after his restoration to the throne, the king gave a magnificent silver tankard to the Wolfe family in recognition of their kindness and bravery in concealing him. “King Charles’ barn” still stands in Madeley today.

William Wilberforce’s Mission for Humane Rights

William Wilberforce’s Mission for Humane Rights
In the late 1700s, when William Wilberforce was a teenager, English traders raided the African coast on the Gulf of Guinea, captured between 35,000 and 50,000 Africans a year, shipped them across the Atlantic, and sold them into slavery. It was a profitable business that many powerful people had become dependent upon.