Category Archives: MEDIEVAL HISTORY

Reign of Tsar Ivan IV, “The Terrible”

Reign of Tsar Ivan IV, “The Terrible”


Ivan IV (1533 – 1584), known as “The Terrible” completed the centralization of Russia that begun with his predecessors. Though his influence is unquestioned, it is difficult to determine which of his actions were motivated by the cool rationalism of a power politician raised in an age of intrigue and sudden death and which were the act of a paranoid who felt beset by traitors.

The Life and Death of Girolamo Savonarola

The Life and Death of Girolamo Savonarola
A Dominican friar and prophet Girolamo Savonarola, living between 1452-1498, is considered the forerunner of the Reformation. A fasting, praying 15th century John the Baptist of his time, Savonorola’s messages were fire, light, and searing conviction. Savonarola was a monk known for his learning and his sanctity, but helpless, almost ludicrous, as a preacher.

St Swithun’s come back

St Swithun’s come back
Swithun is one of England’s most mysterious saints. No one knows exactly why, 108 years after his death, he was transformed into a saint. The reasons were probably political. Winchester Cathedral  – politically, but not ecclesiastically, the premier church in the land – was the place where many Anglo-Saxon kings were buried. As the “capital” of Wessex, the town was also the political heart of late Anglo-Saxon England.

Charles V the Wise

Charles V the Wise

Charles V (1337 – 1380), son of King John II the Good became the first French heir apparent to bear the title of dauphin after the area of Dauphine was added to the royal domain in 1349. Charles became the kingdom’s regent while he was still in his teens after the English captured his father at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356. As regent he dealt successfully with the revolt of the Jacquerie and the popular uprising headed by Etienne Marcel, who armed Paris against royal rule.

The Jewish Diaspora from AD 70 to 1800

The Jewish Diaspora from AD 70 to 1800

For over 2000 years the history of the Jews has combined external dispersal with internal cohesion. The decisive dispersal of the Jewish people took place under Rome. Although the Jewish revolts of AD 66 – 73 and 132 – 5 and their vigorous supression by the Romans, as well as Hadrian’s measures to de –Judaize Jerusalem, caused rapid deterioration in the position of the Jews in Judaea, elsewhere in the Roman world their legal and economical status and the viability of their communities remained unaffected.