Category Archives: MEDIEVAL HISTORY

Nestorian controversy

Nestorian controversy


Nestorius (c. 386 – c. 451) was Patriarch of Constantinople from 428 to 431, at which point he was condemned by the Church as a heretic because he believed that Christ was actually two persons – divine and human. Upon condemnation, Nestorius and his followers formed a new Christian sect, which today is known as Persian, or Nestorian Church.

Dietrick of Bern

Dietrick of Bern

Dietrick of Bern was a heroic but contradictory fictional figure in medieval south Germanic poetry. A 13th century Icelandic author collected the stories into a coherent sequence and incorporated other heroic legends. Medieval chroniclers held that Dietrick was a poetic representation of Theodoric the Great, the 5th century Ostrogothic ruler of Italy.

Thomas Müntzer and Peasants’ War

Thomas Müntzer and Peasants’ War
Peasant-plebeian movement in Reformation strongest was expressed in the Anabaptist movement and the Peasants’ War in Germany 1524-1525. Peasants and urban population (plebs) could not accept Lutheranism and princely Reformation. There were a new sects in the Reformation movement. Anabaptists (re-baptized because they required re-baptism in the mature years of life) were particularly disseminated in the plebeian classes. Some revolutionary Anabaptists preached the abolition of private property and common property.

The Third Crusade: Richard The Lionheart in comparison with other crusaders

The Third Crusade: Richard The Lionheart in comparison with other crusaders
The allure of Jerusalem

King Richard I of England twice marched inland from the Palestinian coast towards Jerusalem, reaching the small dismantled fortress at Beit Nuba, just 12 miles from the Holy City – in December 1191 and gain in June 1192.

The horse in Middle Ages

The horse in Middle Ages
The horse was an integral and essential component of medieval existence. Horses were needed for tournaments, for hunting, for pleasure, for travel, for transport and haulage, for agricultural work, and for war. In the early Middle Ages, the horse was primarily a luxurious method of travel. By the 11th century, however, horses had begun to share some of the burdens of the plow with oxen.