Category Archives: ANCIENT HISTORY

Pompeii and Herculaneum: The cities from the past

Pompeii and Herculaneum: The cities from the past


Pompeii is one of the largest tourist draws in Italy. The town presents visitors with an overwhelming array of archeological evidence, with much more preserved in museum storerooms. When the eruption of Vesuvius started on the morning of 24 August, AD 79, it caught the local population utterly unprepared. Although at the same time, as we now know in retrospect, all the tell-tale signs were there to warn them.

Food feasts in Ancient Rome

Food feasts in Ancient Rome

The festive consumption of food and drink was an important social ritual in the Roman world. Known in general terms as the convivium (Latin: “living together”), or banquet, the Romans also distinguished between specific types of gatherings, such as the epulum (public feast), the cena (dinner, normally eaten in the mid-afternoon), and the comissatio (drinking party).

Sparta – A military city-state

Sparta – A military city-state

City of Sparta, in southern Greece, was founded by the Dorians during the 10 century BC, after they conquered the tribes that originally lived there. Two centuries later, Sparta won a neighboring town Messenia, and thus acquired a very fertile land. Spartans in that times enjoyed the life while doing various crafts, music and poetry. Later, after they were vanquished in war and conquered Messenians  have had permanent sought to regain their freedom, the Spartans became completely devoted to improving the skill of warship. 

The Jewish Diaspora from AD 70 to 1800

The Jewish Diaspora from AD 70 to 1800

For over 2000 years the history of the Jews has combined external dispersal with internal cohesion. The decisive dispersal of the Jewish people took place under Rome. Although the Jewish revolts of AD 66 – 73 and 132 – 5 and their vigorous supression by the Romans, as well as Hadrian’s measures to de –Judaize Jerusalem, caused rapid deterioration in the position of the Jews in Judaea, elsewhere in the Roman world their legal and economical status and the viability of their communities remained unaffected.

The Last Druids

The Last Druids

In the summer of AD 60, a vast Roman army commanded by the Governor of Britain, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, descended on the coast of north Wales. This well disciplined fighting force was directed at eradicating all resistance on the island of Anglesey (Mona Insulis), which lay just off the coast.

There were several motives behind Rome’s assault against Anglesey. For Tacitus, the reasons for Paulinus choosing to attack the island were twofold: “Mona Insulis contained a large population, while it also acted as a haven for refugees.” Paulinus therefore appears to have been intending to remove this independent refuge to which opponents of Roman rule had been fleeing.