Category Archives: GENEALOGY

Karadjordjevic royal family

Karadjordjevic royal family

The Karadjordjevic dynasty is over two centuries old. In 1804, a wealthy Serbian clan chief and leader George (Djordje) Petrovic – known to his followers as “Karadjordje” or “Black George”, after his dark looks – led the Serbs in an uprising against the Ottoman Empire which controlled the Balkans at that time. This first revolt against the Ottoman occupation in the Balkans is known in Serbian history as “The First Serbian Uprising” (Prvi Srpski Ustanak).

The House of Anjou-Naples

The House of Anjou-Naples

Queen Maria transferred her Hungarian dynastic rights to her eldest son, Charles Martel of Anjou (1271 – 95), who died young, and with Andrew III finding it difficult to assert his authority the Angevin claim was supported by Hungary’s Church leaders. Charles Martel’s son, Charles Robert (1288 – 1342), pursued his claim to the throne in Hungary from 1300 onwards, and his coronation as Charles I of Hungary in 1312 marks the start of the Hungarian Angevins’ dynastic history.

The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (13th to 16th century)

The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (13th to 16th century)

Lithuania was first mentioned in 1009, formed a state ca. 1183, and developed into a powerful empire in the 14th century. It survived and gained power in the constant fight with the Teutonic Knights, supported by almost the whole of Catholic Europe, the Tartar hordes and Muscovite Russia. In 1386, Polish nobles had elected a pagan ruler of Lithuania – Jogaila (Jagiello), King of Poland, who was christened then.

Hohenzollern Dynasty

Hohenzollern Dynasty

The Hohenzollerns were German dynasty and princely family who rose to power in the late Middle Ages, becoming electors of Brandenburg in 1415; in the late nineteenth century, they would become the ruling house of Prussia and of imperial Germany.

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandal Kingdom

The Vandals was a name of a group of two tribes, the Silingians and the Hasdingians, that lived in the area between the rivers Oder and Vistula before they migrated to the Danube region during the second century AD. A memory of their time in northern Europe is the region of Silesia, which is named after the Silingians. At the beginning of the fifth century were the Vandals forced to migrate to the west because of pressure from the Huns.