Category Archives: BOOK REVIEW

Book review: Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy, 1453 to the Present by Brendan Simms

Book review: Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy, 1453 to the Present by Brendan Simms


Author: Brendan Simms
Publisher: Allen Lane
Reviewed by: Tim Blanning
Price (RRP): £30

How do you write a history of Europe between the Turkish capture of Constantinople in 1453 and the present day without making it seem like a list of dates? The answer of Brendan Simms in his new book is both simple and brilliantly successful: take a strong thesis and argue it through from start to finish.

Book review: Medieval Pets by Kathleen Walker-Meikle

Book review: Medieval Pets by Kathleen Walker-Meikle
Author: Kathleen Walker-Meikle
Publisher: Boydell Press
Reviewed by: Aleks Pluskowski
Price (RRP): £25

Although the topic of pets and pet-keeping in the Middle Ages has been touched on by other scholars, this is the first book of its kind, with Walker-Meikle bringing together the fragmented sources into a novel and comprehensive survey.

Book Review: Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944–1956 by Anne Applebaum

Book Review: Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944–1956 by Anne Applebaum
Author: Anne Applebaum
Publisher: Allen Lane
Reviewed by: Michael Cox
Price (RRP): £25

Michael Cox praises a masterful account of the rise of communism throughout eastern Europe after the Second World War

Bosworth Field: The battle of 1485

Bosworth Field: The battle of 1485

The battle began when Tudor’s vanguard advanced and engaged with Richard’s, at some point during the morning of 22nd August 1485. After that much is unclear. No one involved in the chaos of medieval battle could have any idea of what was happening beyond his own immediate surroundings. By piecing together a number of accounts, each from its own perspective, we can recapture some of the key moments and gather a sense of what took place. The order in which they took place, and the cause and the effect between them, is ultimately unknowable.

Forest, deer parks and hunting in the time of chivalry

Forest, deer parks and hunting in the time of chivalry

Like the inclusion of crenellations, the creation of a deer park required a license from the Crown. The ownership of hunting land or the right to hunt within it was as much a symbol of noble status as the fortified dwelling or heraldic arms. Vast tracts of land, by the late 12th century maybe as much as a third of southern England, were set aside for hunting.